Fictive

From Pluralpedia, the collaborative plurality dictionary
fictive (n.)
Fictive.png
Applies toheadmates

Fictives are headmates based on a fictional source. Common sources are media like games and books, but almost anything can be a fictive's source, such as original characters or D&D characters created by other system members.[1]

History[edit | edit source]

Fictive was coined in the soulbonding community some time during or before 2004 as a less spiritual way of referring to soulbonds.[2][3]

The term was later adopted by other plural groups, but it is unknown when exactly. It is now widely used beyond its original coinage.

There is a misconception that fictive is short for fictional introject, however this is untrue. Fictive came from soulbonders and is based on a preexisting dictionary term, while fictional introject came from medical settings. Fictives can be fictional introjects if that is the term they choose to identify with, but one should always check which terms a fictive is comfortable with.

Related Terms[edit | edit source]

Factives are headmates based on a non-fictional source, like another person.

Walk-ins and soulbonds can be some types of fictives and were formerly more synonymous.

Introject is an umbrella term which includes fictives and factives, which can be considered medical and avoided by certain types of systems.[4] Though some systems consider the term to be open for use in a non-medical context. The term should not be used for systems without their consent.

Fictionkin can also involve considering oneself to be a fictional entity, but can be experienced by singlets. Fictives may identify as fictionkin if they choose.

Fictive-flux is when a headmate's connection to their source(s) varies over time.

Post-Fictive is someone who no longer identifies as what they were originally a fictive of.

Semi-Fictive is someone who is partially a fictive in some way.

Polyfictive or multifictive is someone who is made up of multiple fictional entities.

Hybrid fictive is someone who is a combination of a fictional entity and something else.

Polyfictives, multifictives and hybrid fictives can all be considered composites.

References[edit | edit source]